Bug reproduction steps

To properly fix a bug, you must be able to reproduce it. If the developers can’t reproduce it they can only guess at its cause and their corrections are just potential fixes that can’t be validated.

If someone writes a report for a bug they can’t reproduce, how can they validate that the developer assigned to the task has satisfactorily fixed the problem? They can’t. So why report and track something that can’t be closed except by a leap of faith?

Maybe because the developer will find the reproduction steps? They might, but then again who stands a better chance of doing this?

The best person to reproduce a bug is the person who first encountered it. To give an analogy, it’s like if you found a secret glade in a forest and you can’t find it again. So you ask someone who’s never been there to find it for you and you don’t give them any directions. Even if they find one on their own, is it the same one you found?

Another situation is the QA or reporter can reproduce it, but the developer can’t. This might be because the reproduction steps aren’t clear or just missing. It could also be that there is a difference between the environments or actions of the reporter and the developer.

Sometimes the bug reporter has produced the issue but hasn’t tried to reproduce it consistently. They write down with they did but haven’t tested their steps further to see if they reproduce the original results every time.

All of these situations can be greatly mitigated by writing good reproduction steps and testing them before submitting the bug report.

How to write reproduction steps:

  • Most bugs report should include reproduction steps. If reproduction can’t be achieved, in most cases, testing should continue.
  • Steps should be clear and concise.
  • Each step should be absolutely necessary to reproduce the bug. This removes clutter but also forces the reporter to distill the bug to it’s most minimal conditions, which helps to define it correctly.
  • No assumptions should be made while writing the steps. This can be very hard as we all have implicit assumptions that are not apparent at first glance. For example, if a user was created for testing purposes, how was it created? What sort of user is it? Is the username included in the report?
  • Before submitting the report, the reproduction steps themselves should be tested. Did they reproduce the issue? Were some required operations omitted because the seemed evident? For example if navigation to a screen occurred and there are several ways to navigate to this screen, which one was used?
  • During the testing of the reproduction steps the scenario should be altered a little. Does the scenario still reproduce the bug with the alterations. If so the altered steps are either unnecessary or could be generalized further. Examples of this could be testing with a different user or changing the sequence of some operations.

In addition to the reproduction steps bug reports for mobile applications should include the OS and device name.

Bug reports for web applications should include the browser and it’s version in the case of Internet Explorer or non evergreen browsers.

All bug reports should include the version number of the application that was under test as well as the environment the bug was found on: dev, qa, prod.

Taking these steps will minimize the back and forth between QA and development and will reduce the time required to close bugs.

 

One thought on “Bug reproduction steps

  1. I will just add this here. I was recently assigned a bug report that said: Alignment issue for user’s with very long email address.

    It turned out that the issue wasn’t caused by having a long email address but rather by having pressed the “Send email” button which changed another message on the page and messed with the alignment.

    This is a good example of why testing reproduction steps may seem like overkill to some, but it’s actually quite important.

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